Barge 2011 Design Competition

Winner


Name
R. Rotem

Firm/Affiliation
Rachely Rotem Studio and Phu Hoang Office

City,State/Country
New York, NY USA

Team Members
P. Hoang, A. Morgan

Lighter than Air

Lighter Than Air is a large pink helium and steam balloon. The iconic proposal uses the principles of atmospheric micro-climates to create a changing form.

According to the author Rachely Rotem, "Every time you visit, it is a different experience." Lighter than Air will provide a novel destination on the Fort Point Channel, one that is active, interactive and visual from all sides of the Channel. Lighter than Air is comprised of a 3-D camouflage net held up by helium-filled weather balloons, forming what the designer and architect call a "camovapor" climate system that floats above the barge. The "camovapor"’s shape and orientation change constantly in response both to the wind and to public activity. Visitors are invited to use an outdoor gym of bicycles to generate "pedal power" that inflates additional weather balloons and transforms liquid water into water vapor—either as mist or steam. As the water vapor condenses on the cool surfaces of the camouflage nets, the 3-D perforation of the camouflage net will temporarily retain this water. When combined with the harbor breeze, cool micro-climate zones will be created.

Honorable Mention


Name
S. Jin

Firm/Affiliation
 

City,State/Country
Munbae-dong, South Korea

Team Members
T. Sandbank

Flow it! Fold it!

Flow it! Fold it! was designed to reflect the movement of water. Their plan included a water garden, a sitting space, and café/bar for visitors to enjoy. This entry was designed to be constructed from prefabricated recycled materials. The tent-like covering would be made a light, plywood sheet supported by thin steel ribs.

Honorable Mention


Name
A. Di Mari

Firm/Affiliation
 

City,State/Country
Boston, MA USA

Team Members

Found Floating

This design included  a series of inner tubes of different sizes set into the floor of the barge. The inner tubes would be able to move from visitor interaction and from buoyancy of the barge.  As the inner tubes moved, energy could be harvested that could be then used to create a passive light.

Honorable Mention


Name
J. Ejzenbart

Firm/Affiliation
Univerity of Manitoba

City,State/Country
Winnipeg, Canada

Team Members
K. Burman

Capullo

Inspired by rain and water, this team created a translucent structure created from fiberglass.  During a rain storm, the rain water would rush through different sized funnels creating a symphony of sound.

Honorable Mention


Name
J. Ross

Firm/Affiliation
University of Tampa

City,State/Country
Tampa, FL

Team Members

Urban Quipu – Talking Strings

Inspired by Quipus, talking strings, Ross’ design includes salvaged ship rope hanging over the barge from a suspended structure.  In ancient cultures, Quipus, a string with various knots tied in it, were used to relay information.  The ship ropes would blow with the Channel breeze and can be knotted by visitors.

Honorable Mention


Name
B. Thames

Firm/Affiliation
University of Kansas

City,State/Country
Lawrence, KS USA

Team Members
P. Broeder

Grow Boston

Taking a page from Boston’s history of claiming land from the sea, Grow Boston begins on land and pieces of it would eventually float out into the Channel.  Covered in grass and plywood, Grow Boston would act as a floating grass garden.  As the grass grew, more sheets of plywood would be added until there were small floating gardens of grass beyond the barge.